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William Jones

Male 1862 - 1918  (~ 55 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  William Jones was born in May 1862 in Odell Creek, Angelina Co, Texas (son of William Marion Jones and Caroline McAnelly); died in 1918 in Angelina Co, Texas.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  William Marion Jones was born on 18 Aug 1828 in Paint Rock, Jackson Co, Alabama (son of Martin William "Gobbler" Jones, Sr. and Rhoda Martin Hodges); died on 17 Sep 1887 in Angelina Co, Texas.

    Other Events:

    • Census: 1860, Homer P.O., Angelina Co, Texas

    Notes:

    Census:
    Residence 358
    Martin Jones 75 North Carolina
    Rhoda Jones 69 1791 Tennessee
    Rhoda M Jones 15 1845 Arkansas
    Harrison Jones 9 1851 Arkansas
    Enoch Jones 6 1854 Arkansas
    Robert Jones 4 1856 Texas

    Residence 359
    Martin W. Jones 42 Tennessee
    Sallie 36 Alabama
    Franklin 16 Arkansas
    Hamilton 14 Arkansas
    William 12 Tennessee
    Marie 11 Tennessee
    Enoch 9 Tennessee
    Mary M. 8 Tennessee
    Rhoda 7 Tennessee
    Eliza J. 5 Tennessee
    Richard 3 Tennessee
    Lucy 1 Tennessee

    residence 360
    Calloway T. Jones 29 Arkansas
    Julia E. 18 Alabama
    William M. 2 Texas

    residence 361
    William Jones 32 Arkansas
    Caroline 28 Texas
    Emily 10 Texas
    Jane 8 Texas
    Margaret 6 Texas
    Rhoda N. 2 Texas

    residence 365
    Edward Baker 24 North Carolina
    Hester L. 26 North Carolina
    Margaret 6 Texas
    Annie L. 3 Texas
    William 1 Texas
    Clesby Jones 11 Arkansas

    William married Caroline McAnelly on 15 Oct 1849 in Marion, Angelina Co, Texas. Caroline was born in 1832 in Illinois; died in 1870 in Angelina Co, Texas. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Caroline McAnelly was born in 1832 in Illinois; died in 1870 in Angelina Co, Texas.
    Children:
    1. Melinda Emily Jones was born on 20 Jan 1850 in Odell Creek, Angelina Co, Texas; died on 27 Jun 1871 in Angelina Co, Texas.
    2. Elizabeth Jane Jones was born in 1852 in Odell Creek, Angelina Co, Texas; died after 1890 in Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches Co, Texas.
    3. Margaret (or Marguerite) Jones was born in 1854 in Odell Creek, Angelina Co, Texas; died about 1878 in Angelina Co, Texas.
    4. Rhoda N. Jones was born in 1858 in Odell Creek, Angelina Co, Texas; died after 1860 in of, Angelina Co, Texas.
    5. 1. William Jones was born in May 1862 in Odell Creek, Angelina Co, Texas; died in 1918 in Angelina Co, Texas.
    6. Taylor Benton Jones was born on 18 Apr 1864 in Jonesville, Angelina Co, Texas; died on 4 Jan 1947 in near, Broaddus, An Augustine Co, Texas.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Martin William "Gobbler" Jones, Sr. was born on 4 Jan 1784 in Surry Co, North Carolina, or Hamblin Co, Tennessee (son of Jesse Riggs* Jones and Miss (..) Clisby); died on 8 Aug 1887 in Polk Co, Texas; was buried in Jonesville Cem, Angelina Co, Texas.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: 1804, Dandridge, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; married
    • Residence: 1806, Jefferson Co, Tennessee
    • Residence: Between 1812 and 1813, Lincoln Co, Tennessee
    • Military: Between 1812 and 1815, War of 1812
    • Military: 24 Sep 1813, War of 1812, Lincoln Co, Tennessee
    • Residence: 1820, Jackson Co, Tennessee
    • Residence: Between 1823 and 1826, Paint Rock, Jackson Co, Alabama
    • Census: 1830, Jackson Co, Alabama
    • Residence: Between 1830 and 1838, Royal Colony (now El Paso), White Co, Arkansas; founded town
    • Property: 20 Sep 1830, Jackson Co, Alabama
    • Residence: Abt Apr 1831, Arkansas
    • Residence: 1837, White Co, Arkansas; tax list
    • Residence: 1838, White Co, Arkansas; tax list
    • Residence: 1838, White Co, Arkansas; tax list
    • Residence: 1839, White Co, Arkansas; tax list
    • Census: 1840, White Co, Arkansas; pg 52
    • Residence: Abt 1840, Angelina Co, Texas
    • Residence: 1840, White Co, Arkansas; tax list
    • Residence: 1845, Jonesville, Angelina Co, Texas
    • Census: 1860, Homer P.O., Angelina Co, Texas
    • Death: 8 Aug 1879, Homer, Angelina Co, Texas

    Notes:

    Ancestry tree with this family:
    http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/48315280/person/12914313462

    -----------
    http://www.argenweb.net/white/history/Biographies/bios4.html
    (info submitted by Annie Lee Nutt and Zorn Jones; also contributors were Belinda K Pierce and Betty Benton Lyle)

    Our Ancestor Martin William Jones Sr. had travelled west into Tennessee. This is where he married our Rhoda Hodges on 12 of July 1804, Lic. # 543, in Dandridge, Jefferson Co., TN. To this union were born nine sons and three daughters, all living to maturity. At this time, very little is known of Rhoda or her family. We do know where she was buried but her grave is now lost in the Jonesville Cemetery. In 1804 Martin and Rhoda were living in Jefferson Co., TN. in the location that they were married. In 1806, while still in Jefferson, Martin had purchased either land or something at the sell from the Widow Sarah Witt Estate. Between 1812 and 1813, they were in Lincoln Co., TN. when Martin volunteered for service in the War of 1812 on 24th of Sept. 1813. He served with the Regiment of Calvary and mounted Gunmen, TN. Volunteers, under Col. John Coffee and Capt. William Locke. After serving his enlistment he was honorably discharged at Fayetteville, TN. As the War continued, he volunteered a second time and served under Maj. William Russell, Capt. James Wyatt, and Col. Jame Allwine. He was honorably discharged again, this time at Ditto's Landing and had to travel 200 miles to Murfreesboro, TN. and home. By 1820, they had moved to Jackson Co., TN. and while living there, they had six of their sons and two or three of their daughters. Between 1826 and 1828 they had moved to Paint Rock, on the Paint Rock River in Jackson Co., AL. which is a little east of Huntsville, AL. They probably traveled along the " Old Beau Trace ". A blazed trail from Eastern TN. to Chickasaw Bluff ( now Memphis) where they crossed the Mississippi River on a log raft in Arkansas Territory, and up the White River to Bull Creek, a rich and fertile valley. Veering a little to the left somewhat towards Little Rock from the Old Beau Trace,which went as far as Batesville, Ark.They founded the town of Royal Colony on the headwaters of Bull Creek which is about where El Paso, Ark. is. They were accompanied by eight other families. One of which was James Walker and his family. Martin and James founded the town. Martin and at least eight of his children were landowners in White and Pulaski Counties, Ark. When Arkansas became a state in 1835, and White Co. was organized, Martin William Jones became it's first Representative to Little Rock, Ark. Serving 1835-1836 and 1837-1838.
    Around 1845-46 restlessness overtook this family again, so they headed for the New Republic of Texas. After weeks of traveling, they finally reached Polk Co. in East Texas. About a mi. east of present town Leggett, they founded Jones Prairie. Enoch Calvin Jones, John Hodges Jones, Clisby Riggs " Tibb 1" Jones, Jesse Riggs Jones, Jasper Hamilton Jones, and Martin William Jones Jr. and maybe others, settled for awhile. Not too far from here, Martin Sr.s' brother Samuel Bethel Jones lived with his family.
    Martin and Rhoda Jones and the other sons and daughters and their families moved on to the Shawnee Prairie area which is now Angelina Co., TX. and where the family founded Jonesville, TX. which became the second Co. seat in Angelina Co. At that time, the area was part of Nacogdoches Co., so the Jones' arrived in East Texas and settled in the Jonesville area before it was designated the County of Angelina. Jonesville was located in the big curve in Hwy. 69, about a mile southeast of the present city of Huntington, TX. where the old Browns' Ferry ( also known as Jasper Rd.) crosses the highway. The old road continues on behind the Jonesville Cemetery to the old Iron Bridge crossing on the Angelina River. The main part of the town was located between the present homes of the Jim Clegg family and the Jeff and Dot Youngblood family. Of course the town was named for its founder Martin William Jones and his family, for he owned the land where the town was founded. It was a part of his survey. Later, William sold part of the land to his son Enoch " E.C." Jones and others.
    A few years after Martin founded Jonesville, Enoch Jones, John Hodges "Jack" Jones, Clisby Riggs " Tibb 1" Jones, Martin William Jones Jr., Jasper Hamilton " Hamp " Jones, James " Jim " Brashears, and others moved to the Jonesville area too. But for some reason or another, Tibb 1 and Hamp decided to move back to Arkansas. They stopped for a while in Bossier Parish, LA. This time they settled in Lafayette Co. which is near Magnolia, Ark. A part of which later became Columbia Co. About 1857 they moved back to Texas and Clisby Tibb1 settled in Angelina Co., TX. near Jonesville. and Jasper " Hamp" went on to Old Knoxville area of Cherokee Co.
    Martin and most of his sons and son-in-laws, had original surveys of land in Angelina Co. around Jonesville, granted to them as third class citizens of Texas ( here before Feb. 19, 1846), when Texas became a state. Martins' survey of 360 acres included part of the city of Jonesville, the Jonesville Cemetery, and north past the present site of the T.&N.O. Railroad, and east for about a mile. At one time, Martin owned over 600 acres in the area. His home was about half a block north of the Cemetery on the same side of the road. Martin was a Farmer and a Stockman. He ran a tannery near the Sixth st. crossing on the railroad. Some of the old bricks from the old vats are still there today. Martins' brand was a O (zero) and his mark was a swallow fork in the left ear and a split in the right. He registered this on 3 Nov. 1852 in Angelina Co., TX.
    Enoch Calvin Jones' survey was somewhat in Jonesville and south of Martins' survey. Martin Jr.s' survey was just south of Jonesville toward what is now called Salem Community. Lloyd Forrest who is one of Martins many g.g.grandsons, owns part of this survey today! Martin Jr. also had another survey of 160 acres southwest of Jonesville, near the old Porter place. William Marion " Bill " Jones had 298.7 acre survey just north of and adjoining the Martin Jones survey, which is towards the present day Huntington Cemetery area. Clisby " Tibb 1 " and John C. Jones ( John C. being a grandson of Martins ), had surveys about a mi. northwest of Jonesville. Cicero B. Burns ( Clisbys' son-in-law ), had a survey northwest of them and is now known as the Old Burns Place. Calaway Franklin " Frank " Jones had a survey norteast of Jonesville near the present day Standley Creek Development. Simpson D. Burks ( another son-in-law of Martins ), had a survey just off the present day Hwy. 69 and Farm 1818 area. James " Jim " Brashears ( another of Martins son-in-laws ), had a survey just south of Jonesville, and Calloway Taylor " Cal " Jones also owned land in the area.
    The first school in the area was taught by J. M. Nash from Mississippi. Who would have taught Martins grandchildren.
    Martin Jones Sr. was a very colorful character. He wore his hair long and he looked quite scruffy with his old Coon Hat atop his head, to say the least of this adoring gentleman. Martin could imitate a turkey gobble so well, he could call them up close. Once while sitting around the Whittlers' bench in Jonesville, Martin boasted to all his friends that he was going to give a certain large OLD Gobbler one more chance, but if he didn't get the bird this time, he was just going to give up on getting him. That afternoon, he took his old gun and walked down into the woods of Joneville and hid behind a large clay root ( a rotted tree stump ), and he began to gobble and gobble. Finally, the big bird came strutting up close by! But by the time Martin rose to shoot, the gobler took his leave! Now that made Martin mad, so mad that he took off his hat and beat it against that old stump! That old gobbler thought the rythmn was that of two other gobblers fighting, so he returned to investigate and Martin saved his reputation and bagged the bird! This is how our Martin earned his nickname " Gobbler " which stayed with him. It was said that after a fight that Gobbler usually won, He would get up on a stump or a log and start to Gobble! Or when a pretty girl would pass in his path he was prone to Gobble! During the town meetings, if he didn't like what was being said after he opened the meeting to the sound of his Gobble, he would then gobble and turn around and leave. He also ended these meetings with his now famous gobble!
    Since Martin had been a member of the legislature in Arkansas, it was natural for him to continue in politics in Angelina Co. He became a commissioner, while the county seat was still a Marion ( Old Marion on Lake Sam Rayburn. With Commissioners Frank Hill and Hardy Parker in 1854, Martin voted to move the county seat of government from Marion to Jonesville where suitable quarters were available. At that time, the Post Office was named Angelina. There were several stores, saloons, and a Baptist Church in Jonesville. THE Sam Houston stood on the steps of the old Jones store and made a speech against secession. Angelina Co. must have taken his advice, for it was the only county in east Texas to vote against secession. But when Texas seceded, Angelina formed two companies early in the War and went off to War.
    In 1856 Homer called for an election to move the county seat from Jonesville to Homer. The first election failed and Jonesville remained county seat. They called for another election in 1858, and this time Homer won. So the county seat was moved to Homer, taking the name of the Post Office along with the courts to Homer. Later the name Homer was restored. This move of the county seat, ultimately caused the death of our Jonesville, which left it a ghost town on the prairie..
    In 1936, during the Texas Centenial, a historical marker was erected on Hwy. 69 near the old Robb place, about a mile east of the site of Jonesville. Which reads:
    SITE OF THE TOWN OF
    JONESVILLE
    SECOND COUNTY SEAT OF
    ANGELINA COUNTY
    8-22-1854 TO 5-19-1858
    ERECTED BY THE STATE OF TEXAS, 1936
    Although it is not located in the correct place, it does mark the area where history was made. Many tourists pull over and read the inscription on the marker, relax, and reminisce of days gone by... The marker might have been placed in this location for a better view or for parking conveniences instead of the actual site in the curve of the Highway where the town of Jonesville was actually located..
    It is said that after the War, the family decided that there were just too many Jones' in the area, so they actually drew straws to decide who would leave or stay. Clisby Tibb 1, Marion, Frank, and Martin Jr. must have drawn to stay. Some went to Polk Co., some to Cherokee and Smith Co., and some to Kaufman, Ennis, Troup, and other places.
    Martin " Gobbler " past away we believe to be on the 8th of August 1860. Family tradition states that he died in Polk Co. and that his wife Rhoda, another woman, and a negro servant who rode on the casket to hold it in, brought his body back to Jonesville in a little surry, to his home, so he could be buried on his own land on a beautiful little round hill a short distance from the home. Now we don't know if there is discrepency in this story, for some believe that Rhoda had passed on before Gobbler? Gobbler lived to be 95 years old. In fact, at age 95 he reckoned he should get some religion, they took Old Gobbler and Baptized him! Could Annie have been confused here on her Rhoda's as we know the given name was handed down and could have been a descendant of Martin? New information gathered in Oct 2000 is Martin did outlive Rhoda (his wife) and that Martin's home had burned down and he was residing with a black gentleman down the road from his home in the black mans dilapidated house. This black gentleman had been a previous slave of Martin's who had stayed on after the slaves were freed after the Civil War.

    Martin was the first of many to be buried here. Soon after Martins death, two of his great grandchildren, the Burks babies, were interred next to Gobbler. It is believed that the babies were brought from Shawnee Prairie or possibly Jonesville. In the plot where Martin lies, are five generations of Jones'. Some of the Jones' buried there are William Marion, Enoch T., William Bryant, Joe Bill, Allie Harvey, Cisby Tibb 1, Calaway Taylor, Susan J. Baird, and many more. Rhoda Jones and Caroline McAnelly are buried there also, but their headstones are lost.

    Information from the Handbook of Texas on Martin is the following, note Martins' deathdate and some other dates are not correct. The deathdate is actually his son William Marion Jones;

    History of the family
    Posted 21 Oct 2010 by olivershannon
    https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/tree/15326039/person/1025625856/media/ef1ec1b1-294f-410f-abf9-2dbfe2d01c4f

    (also from..)
    I've taken information from the records that Annie Lee Nutt had left as her legacy and was sent to me from Zorn Jones and Ina Cardwell. Wonderful family members I never knew existed until I wanted to continue my trace for my Ancestors. Thank you so much for the information. My hopes are that by placing the information on the internet, that others can find an Ancestor through this information, and I hope I have placed my Ancestors in their rightful place. I'd be very surprised if I havn't made my share of mistakes, but I have recorded this information to the best of my abilities at this time.
    author unk

    ---------------------
    William Martin "Gobbler" Jones and Jonesville
    for more information, go to
    www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/JJ/hvj17.html..

    "JONESVILLE, TEXAS (Angelina County). Jonesville, the second of four county seats of Angelina County, was twelve miles southeast of Lufkin on what is now U.S. Highway 69. It succeeded Marion as county seat on August 22, 1854, and held the position until May 19, 1858, when Angelina (later called Homer) assumed the honor. Jonesville was named for Martin William (Gobbler) Jones, an early settler said to be known for his habit of imitating a turkey gobbler. Jones moved his family of twelve children from Alabama to Angelina County in the late 1830s and established them on a place three miles southeast of what is now Huntington. After Angelina County was founded, Jones became a member of the county commissioners' court that voted to make Jonesville the county seat. He also had a tannery near Jonesville, kept cattle, and farmed. The town remained small throughout its history. It had a few saloons, a post office, a few general merchandise houses, and no courthouse. It also had a very small sawmill. At Saturday horse races held in the town, Gobbler Jones would drink until he did his turkey imitation; at that time, said Judge W. J. Townsend, it was time to go home to avoid trouble. Martin Jones was nevertheless a leading citizen of the town and was in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. He died in Jonesville on September 17, 1887, and his was the first burial at Jonesville Cemetery.
    Jonesville was evidently never generally accepted as county seat; public buildings were not built, only rented. The sole step towards establishing the town as a permanent county site was the employment of William G. Lang to survey the town and lay out lots. After an election in which some ballots were apparently destroyed, Angelina was chosen county seat by a vote of 221 to 130. However, the men of Jonesville refused to let the county records out of their hands. A fight ensued during which forty to fifty people were said to have been indicted, though not all were convicted. A body of men from Angelina who were pledged to protect each other went to Jonesville and took the records. Jonesville declined after that event."

    ---------------------

    For pictures, go to www.argenweb/net/white/history/Biographies/Gobler_Jones/gobbler_jones.htm.

    Gobbler Jones Brought Progress to the Frontier.

    My great-great-great-grandfather Martin William "Gobbler" Jones was one of White County's most unique pioneers. He was born August 4, 1784, in North Carolina and wound up in Texas. He distinguished himself during a brief stay in Arkansas by helping found the Old Royal Colony and being elected to the State Legislature. On July 12, 1804, 23 days before his 20th birthday, Martin Jones married Rhoda Hodges in Jefferson County, Tennessee, and settled there. Rhoda was born on January 20, 1791, and therefore was only 13 at the time of her marriage. The first of 12 children was born the following year.
    John Hodges Jones was born on November 30, 1805;
    Clisby Riggs Jones on February 19, 1808;
    Jesse Riggs Jones on August 2, 1810;
    Mary Elizabeth Maribe Jones on March 26, 1813;
    Enoch Calvin Jones on January 30, 1816;
    Martin William Jones Jr. on April 24, 1818;
    Phetna Mariah Jones on September 15, 1820;
    Jasper Hamilton Jones in 1823;
    Franklin Crawford Jones on January 23, 1826;
    William Marion Jones on August 18, 1828;
    Calloway Taylor Jones on May 18, 1831; and
    Rhoda Ann Jones in 1832.

    We know Martin and Rhoda Jones were still living in Jefferson County in 1806, because he was listed as a buyer at the estate sale of Elijah Witt. However, in 1820 they lived in Jackson and Bedford counties of Tennessee. My great-great-grandfather Jasper Hamilton was their last child born in that state. Three years later, in 1826 when Franklin Crawford was born, the family was living in Jackson County, Alabama.

    The Preemption Act of 1830 gave anyone who had cultivated or improved any public lands in Alabama in the year 1829 the privilege of filing a Preemption Claim on their lands and obtaining a patent at the minimum price fixed on government lands at $1.25 an acre.

    In Jackson County, Alabama, on September 20, 1830, Martin Jones bought 80.02 acres in the West of Northwest of Section 2 (Certificate #3260). The Jones family did not stay long after that transaction, because they were in Arkansas Territory when the 11th child, Callaway Taylor Jones, was born the following spring..

    Martin Jones was one of the founders of Old Royal Colony, and here he acquired land. He built what might have been the first bridge across Cypress Bayou. White County records show the following: "Ordered by the Court that the Clerk issue scrip to the amount of $100 to Martin Jones as part of the amount for building a Bridge across Cypress Bayou." And: "It is ordered by the Court that Martin Jones be allowed the sum of $45 for addition built to Cypress Creek Bridge and that County Scrip issue for the same." Also: "On final settlement with Martin Jones for building Cypress Bridge is the sum of $11.87 and County Scrip for the same." Records also show that "In the town of Searcy, Martin Jones Sr. bought Lot Number 10 on 4 October 1841. He also bought Lot Number 6 for $25.? When Arkansas became a state, Martin Jones was elected the first Representative of White County. He served from 1836 to 1838. A story in "Historical Reports of Arkansas" states, "Martin Jones could neither read nor write and was crude of manner and dress. Another report states, ?When the Arkansas Legislature was in session, if Martin Jones did not like the way things were going, he would stand up, gobble like a turkey and walk out." This earned him the nickname of "GOBBLER" for the rest of his life. There was a story that he got his nickname later in Texas, for chasing a turkey around a stump in Angelina County, Texas. However, he was called "GOBBLER" long before he set foot in Texas. Dr. Robert A. Watkins was Arkansas? first Secretary of State, and his young brother-in-law Charles E. Nash worked in his office. Watkins was out of the office most of the time so Nash and State Auditor Elias N. Conway conducted most of the business of the office. Charles E. Nash later became a physician. He wrote reminiscent histories in the form of articles, pamphlets and books. One of his books, entitled "Pioneers of Arkansas, 1822 to 1840, With Reminiscences," from which is taken the following comments connected with The Arkansas Legislature of 1836:
    "The Arkansas Legislature of 1836 was composed of some of the best talent the State has ever produced, while there were others equally ignorant. Many amazing incidents occurred, some of which I recollect to this day. There was an old man named JONES from Searcy. It is unnecessary to say he was dressed in the old copperas-dyed jeans, as this was all the go outside of Little Rock. All farmers, lawyers and doctors were clad in this homemade fabric, nothing else was allowed in those days. He wore a coonskin cap; his hair long, and from its appearance had not been combed for a year. I discovered in his vest pocket, a comb, such as we use in these days to comb the mane and tail of our horses. It was a homemade affair, cut with a penknife out of a buffalo's horn. Jones did not know a letter in a book and had to make his mark when signing a receipt. While I was much annoyed by the members coming into the office to get books, I was spared this annoyance from him. He told me himself that he was elected because he could mimic a turkey gobbler to perfection, which gave him the advantage of all the turkey hunters in the county." This description by Charles E. Nash is the only one ever found on Martin William 'Gobbler' Jones and we have never found a photo of him."

    Wherever they stopped for a while, Martin Jones and his family helped hew from the wilderness a town or settlement, always leaving a place better than they found it. They always owned their own property. They were self sufficient, and relied on themselves. At the time Martin was born and in the places he lived, survival took priority over trying to get to a distant school to learn to read and write. The history of White County, Arkansas, could not have been written without including Martin Jones and his family; neither could have the counties of Polk, Angelina, Nacogdoches, Cherokee, Smith, Leon and others in Texas be written without the contributions of this family. When the Jones family arrived in Arkansas Territory, it was a wild and woolly place, and a person had to be tough to survive there, and to prosper as the Jones family did.

    Martin and Rhoda's third child, Jesse Riggs Jones, was the first of the family to go to Texas. He and his wife Messaline Burks arrived there in 1834. He fought in The Texas War For Independence. He and his family finally settled in Polk County, Texas, where he established JONES PRAIRIE. Martin and Rhoda?s seventh child, Phetna Maria Jones, who became the wife of Simpson D. Burks, died at Old Royal Colony on November 28, 1845, and was buried there in a graveyard that is now lost. Simpson Burks and his two children then went to Texas with Martin and Rhoda and the rest of their children. They settled first near Jesse Riggs? family in Polk County. Their oldest child, John Hodges Jones, and his family also settled there. Gobbler, several sons and sons-in-law obtained land grants in Angelina County as "Third Class Citizens." A requirement was that the recipient had to be a resident of Texas before February 19, 1846. Gobbler's family did not leave Arkansas until after the death of their daughter Phetna Maria on November 18, 1845. So, it is obvious that the family moved to Texas in the winter of that year. Martin Jones' survey of 360 acres included part of what would become the town of Jonesville, the Jonesville Cemetery and north past the Texas & New Orleans Railroad and east for about a mile. In his usual fashion, Martin Jones got a town built and jumped into the middle of local politics. After 57 years of marriage, his wife Rhoda Hodges Jones died on April 11, 1861, and was buried in the Jonesville Cemetery, about a block from their home. Martin's home burned in 1867 and, in a twist of friendship, he wound up living in the nearby home of one of his former slaves. The old black man had stayed and worked for Gobbler after the Civil War ended. Gobbler was 93 when he decided it was time for him to get some religion. He was tied into a chair, lowered into the river and baptized. Martin William "Gobbler" Jones died on August 8, 1879, at the age of 95 and was buried beside Rhoda. She and 9 of their 12 children preceded him in death. I started research on him in 1973, and each year I become more proud.

    (added to several trees in Ancestry)

    ------------
    Regarding parents:
    from History of the family posted 21 Oct 2010 by olivershannon:
    Our Apjones' Ancestors may have come to America from Wales, sometime in the 1700's. After coming to America, they changed their surname by dropping the "Ap". The now Jones', possibly landed in Virginia and headed to North Carolina. We know, but needs further research that Rhoda (who we believe that her mother was a descendant of Edward Riggs), Edward Riggs who had a son Clisby Riggs that ran a still in Jefferson Co., Tennessee who sold his liquor to Davy Crocketts father. Edward had a brother named Timothy Riggs and one named Samuel Riggs. Edward had a son named Samuel who was the father of Dr. Clisby D. Riggs of Jefferson Co., Tennessee. Our family believes there is a definite connection to this line. This is my opinion at this time, but it could be that Gobbler's mother was a Riggs.

    from findagrave:
    Martin William Jones is the son of Ethelred Apjones (disputed) who immigrated from Wales about 1760. Martin's mother is unknown, however she may have been a Rigg's (disputed).

    However, in the narrative of Ethelred, it states "Martin b. Feb 6,1784 and m. first Sarah Olive and Second Nancy Harrison" - which does not concur with other research of Martin's marriage. Other family members listed in narrative do not align with research on this Martin.


    Residence:
    In 1806, while still in Jefferson, Martin had purchased either land or something at the sell from the Widow Sarah Witt Estate (Jefferson Co., Tn. marriages- Witt, Elijah Spouse: Bottom, Sarah Marriage Date: 26 Dec 1797).

    Residence:
    Between 1812 and 1813, they were in Lincoln Co., TN. when Martin volunteered for service in the War of 1812 on 24th of Sept. 1813.

    Military:
    U.S., War of 1812 Service Records, 1812-1815
    Name:
    Martin Jones
    Company:
    REG'T OF CAVALRY AND MOUNTED GUNMEN, TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS.
    Rank - Induction:
    PRIVATE
    Rank - Discharge:
    PRIVATE
    Roll Box:
    113
    Microfilm Publication:
    M602



    Military:
    Between 1812 and 1813, they were in Lincoln Co., TN. when Martin volunteered for service in the War of 1812 on 24th of Sept. 1813. He served with the Regiment of Calvary and mounted Gunmen, TN. Volunteers, under Col. John Coffee and Capt. William Locke. After serving his enlistment he was honorably discharged at Fayetteville, TN. As the War continued, he volunteered a second time and served under Maj. William Russell, Capt. James Wyatt, and Col. James Allwine. He was honorably discharged again, this time at Ditto's Landing and had to travel 200 miles to Murfreesboro, TN. and home.
    History of the Family posted 21 Oct 2010 by olivershannon
    https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/tree/15326039/person/1025625856/media/ef1ec1b1-294f-410f-abf9-2dbfe2d01c4f

    Residence:
    By 1820, they had moved to Jackson Co., TN. and while living there, they had six of their sons and two or three of their daughters.

    Residence:
    Between 1823 and 1826 they had moved to Paint Rock, on the Paint Rock River in Jackson Co., Alabama which is a little east of Huntsville, Alabama. (Martin resided on the land that was the Pre-emption Act of 1830 which you were required to work and improve the land so that he could purchase the land for $1.25 acre. He had purchased 80.02 acres in the w 1/2 of nw 1/4 of section 2 on 29 Sept 1830, certificate # 3260).

    Census:
    1830 Jackson Co Alabama (west of the H. Range Line

    a Weathy (Wesley) Jones; 50-59 (1771-1780) (one of children named Wesley; but Melinda b 1819 is not in this household)
    Home in 1830 (City, County, State):
    Jackson, Alabama
    Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 2 1825-1830
    Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 1 1816-1820
    Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1 1801-1810
    Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 2 1801-1810
    Free White Persons - Females - 50 thru 59: 1 1771-1780
    Free White Persons - Under 20: 3
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 3
    Total Free White Persons: 7
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 7

    -Chesby (Cirby R.) R. Jones (same page 101 as Wm Sparks in 1830 Jackson Co AL - James still at home)
    Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1 1801-1810
    Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1 1801-1810
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
    Total Free White Persons: 2
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):2

    next door to Wm Sparks, where John Sparks, Melinda's future husband was living) (Melinda b 1819 or age 11; not here)
    Martin (translated Master) Jones,
    Home in 1830 (City, County, State):
    Jackson, Alabama
    Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 2 1825-1830
    Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1 1821-1825
    Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 2 1816-1820
    Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1 1801-1810
    Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49: 1 1781-1790
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1 1821-1825
    Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 1 1811-1815
    Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39:1 1791-1800
    Free White Persons - Under 20: 7
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 3
    Total Free White Persons: 10
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):10

    Name:
    Wm Sparkes
    [Wm Sparks]
    Home in 1830 (City, County, State):
    Jackson, Alabama

    Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 1 1825-1830 Jacob E.
    Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1 1821-1825 son6
    Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 2 1816-1820 Daniel; Solomon
    Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1 1811-1815 John S
    Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49: 1781-1790 1 Wm
    Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1 1825-1830 dau7
    Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 1 1816-1820 dau4
    Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 1 1811-1815 dau2
    Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 1 1791-1800 Mrs.
    Free White Persons - Under 20: 8
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
    Total Free White Persons: 10
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):10

    same page:
    Chesby R Jones (maybe a bro?)
    [Cirby R Jones]
    Home in 1830 (City, County, State):
    Jackson, Alabama
    Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1 1801-1810
    Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1 1801-1810
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
    Total Free White Persons: 2
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored):2

    Tho Jone [Thos Jones] (Melinda b 1819 or age 11)
    Home in 1830 (City, County, State):
    Jackson, Alabama
    Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1 1811-1815
    Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 2 1771-1780
    Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1 1825-1830
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 2 1821-1825
    Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 2 1816-1820
    *** COULD BE MELINDA ***
    Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1 1781-1790
    Free White Persons - Under 20: 6
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 1
    Total Free White Persons: 9
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 9


    Residence:
    A blazed trail from Eastern TN. to Chickasaw Bluff ( now Memphis) where they crossed the Mississippi River on a log raft in Arkansas Territory, and up the White River to Bull Creek, a rich and fertile valley. Veering a little to the left somewhat towards Little Rock from the Old Beau Trace, which went as far as Batesville, Arkansas. They founded the town of Royal Colony on the headwaters of Bull Creek which is about where El Paso, Arkansas is. They were accompanied by eight other families. One of which was James Walker and his family. Martin and James founded the town. Martin and at least eight of his children were landowners in White and Pulaski Counties, Arkansas. When Arkansas became a state in 1835, and White Co. was organized, Martin William Jones became it's first Representative to Little Rock, White Co., Arkansas. Serving between 1835-1836 and 1837-1838. Also found on the 1840 White Co., Arkansas Census was a Barnabas Jones and a Stephen Jones. I don't know the kinship at this time.
    "Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Eastern Arkansas
    WHITE COUNTY-LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION-BOUNDARY LINES-TOPOGRAPHY AND GROLOGY-WATER SUPPLY-DRAINAGE-STREAMS-TIMBER-SOIL-RESOURCES-LUMBER. INTERESTS-CENSUS ENUMERATION-TAXABLE PROPERTY-LIVE STOCK INDUSTRY-REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY-RAILROAD FACILITIES-POPULATION-ERA OF SETTLEMENT-COUNTY ORGANIZATION-SEAT of JUSTICE AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS-COUNTY OFFICERS-POLITICS-COURT AFFAIRS-ROLL OF ATTORNEYS-CIVIL WAR HISTORY-TOWNS and VILLAGES-SCHOOLS-CHURCHES-BIOGRAPHICAL
    The Royal Colony, consisting of several families from Tennessee, was founded by James Walker and Martin Jones at the head of Bull Creek, in the northwest part of what is now White County. Lower down on Bull Creek were the settlements of Fielding and Frederick Price. Lewis Vongrolman founded a German settlement on Big Creek and Little Red River with John Magness, Philip Hilger, James King, the Wishes, Yinglings and others. Philip Hilger established and kept the "Hilger's Ferry" across Little Red River, on the old military road leading from Cape Girardeau to Little Rock. Farther north, near the Independence County line, was the Pate Settlement, founded by Lovic Pate. Alfred Arnold, John Akin and John Wright founded the settlement on Little Red River below where West Point is situated. Near the present town of Judsonia was a settlement founded by William Cook and Henry R. Vanmeter. Reuben Stephens settled in the Pate Settlement on the creek that now bears his name. Samuel Guthrie and John Dunaway also settled in that neighborhood."
    "The list just given includes the names of some of the most prominent pioneer settlers, all of whom according to the best information now obtainable, located in their respective places during the decade of the 20's. Others soon followed, and by the date of the organization of the county, 1836, all parts of the territory composing it were more or less sparsely settled. By reference to the population previously stated it will be seen that the settlement, until since the close of the Civil War, continued slow and gradual. Since 1880 there has been a large influx from the northern and eastern States. Most of the early settlers came from Tennessee and other southern States. The early county officers and all mentioned elsewhere in connection with the organization of the county were, of course, pioneer settlers."
    "White County was organized in accordance with the provisions of an act of the legislature of Arkansas Territory, approved October 23, 1835. The first sessions of court were held at the house of David Crise, on the place now known as the McCreary farm, three and a half miles east of Searcy. The organization of the county was completed early in 1830."
    "The first State senator for White County was R. C. Byrd, and the first representative in the house was Martin Jones.

    History of the Family posted 21 Oct 2010 by olivershannon
    https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/tree/15326039/person/1025625856/media/ef1ec1b1-294f-410f-abf9-2dbfe2d01c4f


    Property:
    In Jackson County, Alabama, on September 20, 1830, Martin Jones bought 80.02 acres in the West of Northwest of Section 2 (Certificate #3260). The Jones family did not stay long after that transaction, because they were in Arkansas Territory when the 11th child, Callaway Taylor Jones, was born the following spring.


    Residence:
    In Jackson County, Alabama, on September 20, 1830, Martin Jones bought 80.02 acres in the West of Northwest of Section 2 (Certificate #3260). The Jones family did not stay long after that transaction, because they were in Arkansas Territory when the 11th child, Callaway Taylor Jones, was born the following spring.

    Residence:
    Name: MARTIN SR. JONES
    State: AR
    County: White County
    Township: No Township Listed
    Year: 1837
    Record Type: Tax list
    Page: 004
    Database: AR 1830-1839 Tax Lists Index


    Residence:
    Arkansas, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1819-1870
    Name:
    Martin Jones
    State:
    AR
    County:
    White County
    Township:
    No Township Listed
    Year:
    1838
    Record Type:
    Tax list
    Page:
    012
    Database:
    AR 1830-1839 Tax Lists Index



    Residence:
    Name: MARTIN JONES
    State: AR
    County: White County
    Township: No Township Listed
    Year: 1838
    Record Type: Tax list
    Page: 012
    Database: AR 1830-1839 Tax Lists Index

    Residence:
    Name: MARTIN JONES
    State: AR
    County: White County
    Township: No Township Listed
    Year: 1839
    Record Type: Tax list
    Page: 007
    Database: AR 1830-1839 Tax Lists Index

    Residence:
    Around 1845-46 restlessness overtook this family again, so they headed for the New Republic of Texas. After weeks of traveling, they finally reached Polk Co. in East Texas. About a mi. east of present town Leggett, they founded Jones Prairie. Enoch Calvin Jones, John Hodges Jones, Clisby Riggs " Tibb 1" Jones, Jesse Riggs Jones, Jasper Hamilton Jones, and Martin William Jones Jr. and maybe others, settled for awhile. Not too far from here, there resides a Samuel Bethel Jones who lived with his family.
    Martin and Rhoda Jones and the other sons and daughters and their families moved on to the Shawnee Prairie area which is now Angelina Co., Texas and where the family founded Jonesville, Texas which became the second Co. seat in Angelina Co. At that time, the area was part of Nacogdoches Co., so the Jones' arrived in East Texas and settled in the Jonesville area before it was designated the County of Angelina. Jonesville was located in the big curve in Hwy. 69, about a mile southeast of the present city of Huntington, Texas. where the old Browns' Ferry ( also known as Jasper Rd.) crosses the highway. The old road continues on behind the Jonesville Cemetery. to the old Iron Bridge crossing on the Angelina River. The main part of the town was located between the present homes of the Jim Clegg family and the Jeff and Dot Youngblood family. Of course the town was named for its founder Martin William Jones and his family, for he owned the land where the town was founded. It was a part of his survey. Later, William sold part of the land to his son Enoch " E.C." Jones and others.
    History of the family

    Posted 21 Oct 2010 by olivershannon
    https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/tree/15326039/person/1025625856/media/ef1ec1b1-294f-410f-abf9-2dbfe2d01c4f

    -----------------
    Jones moved his family of twelve children from Alabama to Angelina County in the late 1830s [sic] and established them on a place three miles southeast of what is now Huntington. After Angelina County was founded, Jones became a member of the county commissioners' court that voted to make Jonesville the county seat.

    Residence:
    Name: Jones, Martin, Sr.
    Home in 1840: Union, White, AR
    County: White
    State: Arkansas
    Year: 1840
    Roll: M704_20
    Page: 246
    Image: 212
    Name: Jones, Martin, Sr.
    Home in 1840: Union, White, AR
    County: White
    State: Arkansas
    Year: 1841
    Page: 0

    Residence:
    Gobbler's family did not leave Arkansas until after the death of their daughter Phetna Maria on November 18, 1845. So, it is obvious that the family moved to Texas in the winter of that year. Martin Jones' survey of 360 acres included part of what would become the town of Jonesville, the Jonesville Cemetery and north past the Texas & New Orleans Railroad and east for about a mile. In his usual fashion, Martin Jones got a town built and jumped into the middle of local politics.

    Census:
    Homer P.O., Angelina County, Texas
    Residence 358
    Martin Jones 75 North Carolina
    Rhoda Jones 69 1791 Tennessee
    Rhoda M Jones 15 1845 Arkansas
    Harrison Jones 9 1851 Arkansas
    Enoch Jones 6 1854 Arkansas
    Robert Jones 4 1856 Texas
    (grandchildren, children of Jasper Hamilton Jones, their mother Catherine Vanwinkle had just died in 1859)

    Residence 359
    Martin W. Jones 42 1818 Tennessee
    Sallie 36 Alabama
    Franklin 16 Arkansas
    Hamilton 14 Arkansas
    William 12 Tennessee
    Marie 11 Tennessee
    Enoch 9 Tennessee
    Mary M. 8 Tennessee
    Rhoda 7 Tennessee
    Eliza J. 5 Tennessee
    Richard 3 Tennessee
    Lucy 1 Tennessee

    residence 360
    Calloway T. Jones 29 Arkansas
    Julia E. 18 Alabama
    William M. 2 Texas

    residence 361
    William Jones 32 Arkansas
    Caroline 28 Texas
    Emily 10 Texas
    Jane 8 Texas
    Margaret 6 Texas
    Rhoda N. 2 Texas

    residence 365
    Edward Baker 24 North Carolina
    Hester L. 26 North Carolina
    Margaret 6 Texas
    Annie L. 3 Texas
    William 1 Texas
    Clesby Jones 11 Arkansas

    Martin married Rhoda Martin Hodges on 10 Jul 1804 in Dandridge, Jefferson Co, Tennessee. Rhoda was born on 20 Jan 1791 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died between 11 Apr 1859 and 1861 in Jonesville, Angelina Co, Texas; was buried in Jonesville Cem, Angelina Co, Texas. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Rhoda Martin Hodges was born on 20 Jan 1791 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died between 11 Apr 1859 and 1861 in Jonesville, Angelina Co, Texas; was buried in Jonesville Cem, Angelina Co, Texas.

    Notes:

    Married:
    Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002
    Martin James
    [Martin Jones]
    Spouse:
    Rhoda Hodges
    Marriage Date:
    10 Jul 1804
    Marriage County:
    Jefferson

    Children:
    1. John Hodges Jones was born on 30 Nov 1805 in Jefferson City, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died on 9 May 1864 in Jones Prairie, Polk Co, Texas.
    2. Clisby Riggs Jones was born on 8 Feb 1808 in Hamblin, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died on 2 Jan 1890 in Angelina Co, Texas.
    3. Jesse Riggs Jones was born on 2 Aug 1810 in Jefferson City, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died on 14 Jul 1848 in Jones Prairie, Polk Co, Texas.
    4. Mary Elizabeth Maribe Jones was born on 26 Mar 1813 in Jefferson City, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died in 1868 in Jonesville, Angelina Co, Texas.
    5. Enoch Calvin Jones was born on 30 Jan 1816 in Jefferson City, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died on 11 Jun 1886 in Hot Springs, Garland Co, Arkansas.
    6. Martin William Jones, Jr. was born on 24 Apr 1818 in Jefferson City, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died on 20 Jan 1864 in Jonesville, Angelina Co, Texas; was buried in Jonesville Cem, Angelina Co, Texas.
    7. Phetna Mariah Jones was born on 15 Sep 1820 in Jefferson City, Jefferson Co, Tennessee; died on 28 Nov 1845 in Old Royal, White Co, Arkansas.
    8. Jasper Hamilton Jones was born in 1823 in Bedford, Jackson Co, Tennessee; died in 1872 in Cherokee, Travis Co, Texas.
    9. Franklin Crawford Jones was born on 23 Jan 1826 in Paint Rock, Jackson Co, Alabama; died on 4 Sep 1882 in Jonesville, Angelina Co, Texas.
    10. 2. William Marion Jones was born on 18 Aug 1828 in Paint Rock, Jackson Co, Alabama; died on 17 Sep 1887 in Angelina Co, Texas.
    11. Callaway Taylor "Cal" Jones was born on 18 May 1831 in Old Royal Colony, White Co, Arkansas; died on 1 Aug 1874 in Lufkin, Angelina Co, Texas.
    12. Rhoda Ann Elizabeth Jones was born in 1832 in Old Royal Colony, White Co, Arkansas; died in 1866 in Angelina Co, Texas.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Jesse Riggs* Jones was born about 1750; died after 1800 in Surry Co, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Census: 1790, Wake Co, North Carolina

    Notes:

    Post-Em found on Rootsweb tree: Posted by John and Marjorie Watts Mustard <767capt@.net> 1 Jan 2005 - says, "Martin William "Gobbler" Jones Sr. was father of John Hodges and Clisby Riggs Jones, and he and Rhoda Hodges had 12 children that I can find. Father was Jesse Riggs Jones, mother had last name of Clisby, unknown first name, as far as I can find."
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igmpostem.cgi?op=show&app=:2879459¬ify=Pb5lkYLsNjS6RlVQc8dU8eXWLsjLYRQC&key=I567328306&return=%3Ca+href%3D%22%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Figm%2Ecgi%3Fop%3DGET%26amp%3Bdb%3D:2879459%26amp%3Bid%3DI567328306%22%3EReturn+to+WorldConnect%3C%2Fa%3E

    ------------

    http://www.argenweb.net/white/history/Biographies/bios4.html
    (info submitted by Annie Lee Nutt and Zorn Jones; also contributors were Belinda K Pierce and Betty Benton Lyle)

    Our Apjones' Ancestors came to America from Wales, sometime in the 1700's. After coming to America, they changed their surname by dropping the "Ap". The now Jones', possibly landed in Virginia and headed to North Carolina. After a short time, they moved westward, southward, southwest, and northwest. Martin is listed on the 1780 Surry Co., N.C. Census. Neighbors living next door on this Census are Timothy Riggs from New Jersey who was Justice of the Peace, and his son Clisby Riggs who ran a still in Jefferson Co., Tennessee who sold his liquer to Davy Crocketts father. Timothy Riggs also had sons Eziah, Jesse and a Dr. Clisby Riggs. Our family believes there is a definite connection to this line also.


    Census:
    1790 Wake Co, North Carolina
    4 males under 16 (b before 1776)
    1 male 16 and over
    free white females 4
    slaves 4
    total 10

    next:
    Ethan Jones
    1 male 16 and over
    3 males under 16
    4 free white females
    -
    -
    8

    Jesse married Miss (..) Clisby about 1769. Miss was born about 1750; died after 1790. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Miss (..) Clisby was born about 1750; died after 1790.
    Children:
    1. Wesley Jones, (bro of Martin?) was born between 1771 and 1780; died after 1830 in of, Jackson Co, Alabama.
    2. Thomas* Jones, (bro of Martin?) was born between 1771 and 1780 in Virginia; died after 1840 in of, Jackson Co, Alabama.
    3. 4. Martin William "Gobbler" Jones, Sr. was born on 4 Jan 1784 in Surry Co, North Carolina, or Hamblin Co, Tennessee; died on 8 Aug 1887 in Polk Co, Texas; was buried in Jonesville Cem, Angelina Co, Texas.


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